Build search queries

  

Narrow in on exactly the conversations you’re interested in by defining detailed search queries.

Start by becoming familiar with the keywords and phrases people use when talking about your particular topic or brand. Enter those into the search field to see the results that are surfaced. Then use the boolean operators listed in the table below to optimize the results. Narrow in on a particularly valuable kind of mention, and exclude any irrelevant mentions from your search.

Insights will flag if a search query is formatted incorrectly, letting you know what to fix.

Basic tips:

  • Search terms are not case-sensitive.
  • Separating terms with spaces is like using the AND operator (see below). The query results will contain all of the terms. If you're searching for a phrase that contains spaces, enter it within quotation marks.
  • Note when using region: and city: location operators that not all mentions contain granular location metadata, so where unavailable the location will default to the country where the site domain is registered.

Some search examples:

  • ((adidas OR @adidas OR #adidas) NEAR/5 (olympics OR tokyo2020))
  • ((I OR Im OR Id OR Ive OR Iv) NEAR/5 vegetarian)
  • “Multicloud technology”~5
Operator Example Description 
" " "apple juice" Terms containing a space must be entered within quotation marks.
This example will find mentions of the exact phrase 'apple juice' on any webpage.
AND apple AND juice Mentions contain all the terms. AND must be capitalized.
This example will find mentions of 'apple' and 'juice' on the same webpage. Mentions with only one of these terms will not be returned.
OR apple OR juice Mentions contain any of the terms. OR must be capitalized.
This example will find mentions of 'apple' or mentions of 'juice' or mentions of both on any webpage.
NOT apple NOT juice Mentions contain the first term and not the second. NOT must be capitalized.
This example will find mentions of 'apple' on a page as long as 'juice' is not mentioned on that page.
( )  (apple AND juice) OR (apple AND sauce) Brackets group terms together, so an operator can be applied to everything in the brackets.
This example will find mentions of 'apple' and 'juice' on the same page or mentions of 'apple' and 'sauce' on the same page. 
~ "apple juice"~5 The proximity operator (tilde) provides flexibility to how close the words in quotes appear in relation to each other. Terms must appear in the order specified. The tilde is always used after a phrase in quotes and followed immediately by a number.
This example will find mentions of the exact phrase 'apple juice' and mentions of 'apple' and 'juice' within 5 words of each other, e.g. 'This drink was made with fresh apple, orange and pear juice'
NEAR/x (apple OR orange) NEAR/5
(smartphone OR phone)


((apple OR orange)
AND
(smartphone OR phone))~5
Retrieves mentions where the terms are found within x number of words apart. This operator counts the words between the two terms, so their order does not matter. It can be combined with other operators. NEAR must be written in uppercase.
This example will find mentions of 'apple' within 5 words of 'smartphone' or 'phone' and mentions of 'orange' within 5 words of 'smartphone' or 'phone'
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We also support the ~ (tilde) Near operator. In this instance, Near is represented by identifying your two sets of keywords and following them with a tilde and the maximum number of words separating them.
For advanced users: This option does not allow more than one layer of nesting. If you require more advanced nesting, please use the NEAR/x operator. e.g. (((apple OR orange) NEAR/5 (juice OR lemonade)) NEAR/5 summer) 
NEAR/xf logitech NEAR/2f keyboard The NEAR/xf operator works like the NEAR/x operator except terms must appear in the exact order specified.
This example will find mentions where 'logitech' appears before 'keyboard' with 2 or fewer words in-between. e.g., 'logitech keyboard', 'Logitech Bluetooth Keyboard', 'Logitech Solar Keyboard'
<<< >>> <<< Write yourself a note here >>> Allows you to add your own comments into different sections of the query. Does not work within a bracketed string.
{ } {BT} This operator indicates exact spelling. It will only retrieve mentions where capital/lower case letters are used in this exact way. The {} only works for words with up to 5 characters. Any words with more than 5 characters will find any capital/lower case spelling of the word.
Ä,è,ñ etc “niño” Accented keywords will only match mentions with words spelled exactly as you type them. However non-accented words will match everything whether or not the letters are accented. To exclude specific accented words, use the NOT operator. E.g. Nino NOT niño
continent: continent:"EUROPE" AND "apple juice" Use in conjunction with AND to restrict results to those coming from the specified continent. continent: must be lowercase.
This example will only find mentions of the exact phrase 'apple juice' that have been identified as from Europe.
city: city:"GBR.Greater London.London" AND "apple juice" Use in conjunction with AND to restrict results to those coming from the specified city. city: must be lowercase.
Download the attachment at the bottom of this article for a complete list of city codes.
This example will only find mentions of the exact phrase 'apple juice' that have been identified as from London.
country: country:"GBR" AND "apple juice" Use in conjunction with AND to restrict results to those coming from the specified country. country: must be lowercase.
Download the attachment at the bottom of this article for a complete list of country codes.
This example will only find mentions of the exact phrase 'apple juice' that have been identified as from the UK.
region: region:USA.FL AND “apple juice” Use in conjunction with AND to restrict results to those coming from the specified region. The region specifier can be used to indicate a state, region, or province. It consists of a country code followed by a region's name or abbreviation. region: must be lowercase.
Download the attachment at the bottom of this article for a complete list of region codes.
site: site:twitter.com AND "apple juice" Use in conjunction with AND to restrict results to those coming from a specific website. Or use with NOT to exclude mentions from a site. Note: You have to type out the .tld (e.g. .com or .co.uk) when using the site: operator. Do not use www. before the domain name. The site: operator searches the top level of a domain. Use the url: operator to search for mentions in a particular part of a site.
This example will find any mention of 'apple juice' on Twitter.
url: url:"msn.com/news" AND "Simon Cowell" Finds mentions on a particular part of a site. Use quotation marks to match the exact section of a url.
This example will find any mention of 'Simon Cowell' on the news section of the MSN website.
Note: using the Url: operator will not match any Twitter urls.
title: title:"apple juice" Searches for terms found in a web page’s title. Most useful for exclusions to remove any mentions that have a specific word in the title.
Note: When you write a keyword in your Boolean, it will match both body and title of any relevant post.
author: author:justinbieber Retrieves mentions from specific authors.
This example will find mentions across all page types, e.g. tweets, blogs, forums, by any author called justinbieber. This operator matches exact author names only, so justinbieber95 would not be retrieved.
* complain* The asterisk is a wildcard operator. It works with plain text only, to match additional characters in the middle or at the end of a word. It can’t be placed before a word.
This example will find mentions with the root word complain, e.g. 'complain', 'complaints', 'complained' etc.
latitude: longitude:[-73 TO -69] AND latitude:[41 TO 44] Used to indicate the specific coordinates you want to associate with your query. You can either combine them or use them individually.
longitude: longitude:[-73 TO -69] AND latitude:[41 TO 44] Used to indicate the specific coordinates you want to associate with your query. You can either combine them or use them individually.

 

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